75 million Americans under threat of severe weather


The scope is staggering. Some 75 million Americans are under threat of severe weather on Tuesday. People from the Great Lakes to the Gulf Coast, and from the Midwest to the East Coast, are advised to keep their eyes to the sky and their ears to the radio. That’s a third of the country, CNN reports.
The greatest risk will again be in the Deep South, with Mississippi and Alabama in the bull’s eye for the worst of the storms.
The first two days of this powerful spring storm system, which is expected to rage into Wednesday, claimed 29 lives in six states.
Residents across the region huddled in hallways and basements on Monday as a string of tornadoes ripped through their states.
Eight people died in Mississippi on Monday, the state emergency management office said. Few additional details were immediately available.
Two people died in Lincoln County, Tennessee, near the border with Alabama.
And two more were killed at a trailer park west of Athens, Alabama. A third person died in Tuscaloosa after a retaining wall collapsed on him.
Severe weather also rumbled through the Birmingham area late Monday.
“We got report of damages in Kimberly, Morris (and) Bessemer,” said Horace Walker a spokesman for Jefferson County Emergency Management. “No reports of injuries, but I expect for that to change because we do have entrapments.”
Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley declared a state of emergency for all counties. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal did the same as the severe weather advanced.
Of the eight fatalities in Mississippi, one of them occurred in Richland, said Rankin County Emergency Management Director Bob Wedgeworth.
Monday’s storms were Act II of a powerful weather system that brought punishing thunderstorms to the central United States. Tornadoes spawned by those storms on Sunday killed 14 people in Arkansas and one each in Oklahoma and Iowa, authorities in those states reported.

Leave a Reply