Contemporary design exhibition at Russian Science and Culture Centre in Bucharest

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Romanian designer Carmen Emanuela Popa will present on March 3, at the Russian Science and Culture Centre in Bucharest, a series of conceptual fashion items that are part of prestigious collections presented on international podiums at events such as the Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia or the Athens Xclusive Designers Week. Items from the Woman N, Contemporary Unknown Soldier collections or from the first collection signed Carmen Emanuela Popa, will be accompanied by a number of original sketches from the designer.

“Likewise, a surprise element of the exhibition will visually mark the designer’s artistic-sentimental link with Russian culture and art. The event will feature a piano and contemporary dance moment, a homage paid to classical Russian ballet with contemporary undertones.
The exhibition is open on March 3-11.

Designer Carmen Emanuela Popa felt an attraction for the world around her from a very young age, having a profound artistic vision on the way it should be represented, through water colour drawings and then oil paintings. Her characters then put on a metaphorical coat that says everything about the way she is impressed with life under all its forms, directly confessing, every time, her way “of being.”

“Thank you for giving me this amazing opportunity to exhibit some of my inner world transfigured into immediate realities, in such a generous space, through the kindness of Director Natalia Muzhennikova. The works exhibited here are a form of directly displaying my attachment to Russian art and culture,” the designer stated.

“Carmen Emanuela Popa recently militated for peace in Paris. The coat of the Contemporary Unknown Soldier was worn again, this time on a real street podium, on International Peace Day, on 21 September 2015. The designer was overwhelmed with emotion when she sang “vive la paix” and it seemed like the voice of the contemporary unknown soldier was identical to that of the one from the past, in essence the universal one,” the organizers show.