Romanians believe introduction of the euro would have positive consequences


All EU Member States are to adopt the common currency, the euro, once they have fulfilled the criteria defined in the Maastricht Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. There is no common strategy or fixed timetable for the introduction of the euro in the Member States that joined in or after 2004, but the Treaty does require them to join the euro area at an undefined date in the future.
There has been a marked increase since 2013 in the proportion of respondents who think that introducing the euro would have a positive impact for their own country: 44 percent (+5) think it would be positive, while 50 percent (-4) say it would be negative.
According to a recent Flash Eurobarometer 400 survey, Romania and Hungary are the only countries in which a majority of respondents think the introduction of the euro would have positive consequences for their country. Compared with the 2013 survey, an increased number of people now think that the personal consequences of introducing the euro would be positive: 45 percent (+6) think they will be positive, while 46 percent (-4) think they will be negative.
For this time too, Romania and Hungary are the only countries where a majority of respondents think the introduction of the euro will have positive consequences for them personally. In Lithuania, 35 percent (+2) see positive personal consequences and 44 percent (-3) negative. In Romania, 85 percent of respondents think that their country will join the euro at some point (+5 compared with 2013). Of these 45 percent (+1) of respondents think that their country will join the euro by 2019, while 40 percent (+7) think it will happen in 2020 or later. Just 3 percent (-1) think the country will never join the euro, although 12 percent (-4) of respondents don’t know when Romania will introduce the currency. A majority of respondents in six countries think that introducing the euro will increase prices, ranging from 76 percent in Poland to 50 percent in Hungary, while 48 percent think so in Romania. In Lithuania, 75 percent (-3) think that prices will increase. When asked how many EU countries have al ready introduced the euro, three out of 10 NMS7 respondents (30 percent) give the correct answer: 18. The number of respondents able to state the correct number of euro area countries ranges from 39 percent in Croatia to 25 percent in Romania.

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