POLITICS

INSCOP’s parliamentary elections 2016 survey: 47.2 pc of Romanians believe there is the need for new parties in Romania

PNL would win the parliamentary elections if they were to take place next Sunday, followed by PSD and UDMR, an INSCOP survey shows.

PNL tops the Romanians’ voting preferences with 40.1 per cent of the expressed voting intentions (compared to 42 per cent in September). PNL is followed by PSD with 36.3 per cent (35 per cent in September), UDMR with 5.2 per cent (5 per cent in September), PMP with 4.4 per cent (2.5 per cent in September), ALDE with 4 per cent (2.6 per cent), UNPR with 2.6 per cent (5.1 per cent in September), M10 with 2.4 per cent (2 per cent in September), PSRO with 2.1 per cent (2 per cent in September), PRM with 1.1 per cent (1.3 per cent in September) and PNTCD with 1 per cent (1 per cent in September), the survey shows.

The percentage of respondents that did not pick a party stands at 44.1 per cent – 27.6 per cent are undecided, 10.5 per cent will not vote and 6 per cent did not want to answer, the INSCOP survey shows.

41.6 per cent of the male respondents that will vote chose PNL and 34 per cent of them PSD. 38.1 per cent of the female respondents that will vote chose PNL, while 39.2 per cent chose PSD.

Ordered by age groups, 50.7 per cent of the respondents that will vote and are part of the 18-34 age group chose PNL, while 26.3 per cent of them chose PSD.

43.5 per cent of the respondents that are part of the 35-49 age group chose PNL and 26.3 per cent chose PSD. 7.3 per cent of the 50-64 age group chose PNL, and 36.7 per cent chose PSD.

27.1 per cent of the respondents that are part of the 65+ age group chose PNL, while 55.6 per cent chose PSD, the survey shows.
Ordered by education levels, 34.8 per cent of the respondents that have primary education chose PNL, while 50.4 per cent chose PSD. 43.2 per cent of the respondents that have secondary education chose PNL, while 34 per cent chose PSD. Moreover, 35.7 per cent of the respondents with tertiary education chose PNL, while 29.5 per cent chose PSD.

43.6 per cent of the respondents that live in urban areas chose PNL and 31.2 per cent chose PSD, while 35.8 per cent of the respondents that live in rural areas chose PNL and 42.6 per cent chose PSD.

Ordered by regions, 37.4 per cent of the respondents in Moldavia and Bucovina chose PNL, while 46.6 per cent chose PSD. 41.5 per cent of the respondents in Wallachia and Dobrogea chose PNL, while 38.9 per cent chose PSD. 45.3 per cent of the respondents in Banat, Crisana and Maramures chose PNL, while 24 per cent of them chose PSD. 37 per cent of the respondents in Transylvania chose PNL, while 28.3 per cent of them chose PSD.

Asked whether they would vote for a newly established party, 36.2 per cent of Romanians answered positively, 33.7 per cent negatively, 21.4 per cent stated they are undecided and 8.7 per cent did not answer. “Of the 30.1 per cent that are undecided or did not answer, 28.7 per cent would be willing to vote for such a party if it were to promote persons that have had no previous political affiliations. 7.9 per cent would not vote for such a party, 44.4 per cent are undecided and 19 per cent do not know or do not want to answer,” the INSCOP survey shows.

47.2 per cent of the respondents believe there is the need for new parties in Romania although they believe such parties have limited chances of survival.

At the same time, 40.7 per cent of the respondents are in favour of the emergence of new parties despite the fact that the parties recently set up have been a disappointment, and 41.6 per cent of them believe that all existing parties should disappear and new ones should replace them, the INSCOP survey shows.

The INSCOP survey was ordered by ‘Adevarul’ daily and was conducted by INSCOP Research from November 26 to December 2.

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