ECONOMY FINANCE&BANKING

EIB President Hoyer visits Romania to expand support to investments

Werner Hoyer, President of the European Investment Bank (EIB), visits Romania on Tuesday to discuss the bank’s engagement in the country and explore opportunities to provide greater support for long-term investment to accelerate economic development in Romania and improve the quality of life of the country’s citizens, the EIB informed in a release.

Hoyer will meet President Klaus Iohannis, Prime Minister Dacian Ciolos, and other senior politicians, government representatives and business leaders.

“The EIB, the EU Bank, remains committed to broaden our engagement in Romania and ensure that investment in the country can benefit from new financing opportunities. We wish to build on our strong cooperation with the country, where over the last 25 years the EIB has provided more than EUR 10.6 billion for long-term investment, crucial to create jobs, strengthen economic growth and improve quality of life of its citizens. EIB also contributed to numerous unfunded initiatives aimed at improving the absorption of EU Funds and Foreign Direct Investments,” Hoyer commented.

EIB loan signatures in 2015 amounted to 228 million euros, bringing the total lending volume in Romania over the past five years (2011-2015) to 2.6 billion euros. In recent years the EIB has supported investment across all major sectors of the economy, including transport, communications, energy and the environment, development of a knowledge economy and increasing access to finance for small and medium-sized companies through local financial institutions partners.

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