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September 26, 2020
POLITICS

Liviu Dragnea: I tore up Victor Ponta’s resignation; there’s no point meeting, the airplane is crowded

The Social Democratic Party (PSD) President Liviu Dragnea stated on Monday that he tore up Victor Ponta’s undated resignation because he did not find it to be “something serious” and does not want to remain caught-up in these “games.” The Social Democrats’ leader claimed he would not meet the ex-Premier anymore, considering that the airplane is “crowded.”

“In what concerns Mr Victor Ponta’s resignation, the undated resignation, as I said, I tore it up because I don’t find it to be something serious and I really no longer want to remain in these games. Victor Ponta is a man we need in the party, nobody is kicking him out of the party. If he wants to remain and be active in the party, very well; if not, it’s his call. I no longer want to take part in these games,” the PSD President stated.

Asked whether Victor Ponta was shown preferential treatment within the party, Liviu Dragnea answered negatively.

“No, I don’t believe there is any party member who was kicked out of the party for criticising the leadership,” the leader of the Social Democrats said.

The Lower Chamber Speaker pointed out he will no longer meet Victor Ponta, considering that the “airplane is crowded.”

“I consider this closed. I no longer even intend to have any meeting with Victor, like he was proposing for us to meet along with Premier Sorin Grindeanu too. Since it was said the airplane is very crowded, I say we shouldn’t cram ourselves there,” Liviu Dragnea concluded.

On Friday evening, Victor Ponta stated for Antena3 private television broadcaster that he met PSD President Liviu Dragnea, for approximately one hour, around noon that day. Ponta said he left Dragnea his undated resignation from the party and expects the PSD leader to take a decision.

Ponta pointed out he wrote his resignation from PSD and gave it to Liviu Dragnea, waiting for the latter to take a decision.

When the anchor insisted, Victor Ponta said the resignation was undated and he is still a PSD member and “may” continue to be one.

“I don’t want to leave PSD, but I want to keep some rights – which I had back when Adrian Nastase was [party president] and back then Mircea Geoana was [party president] –, to support PSD when I believe it’s going in the right direction and to express my opinion when I believe things are not going in the right direction,” the ex-Premier explained his gesture.

Asked how his meeting with Liviu Dragnea went, Victor Ponta answered: “We talked for an hour. We had a fairly long talk and you shouldn’t imagine we got into a fight, out of the question. (…) We met around noon.”

 

PM Grindeanu: Ponta criticises sometimes, most of times constructively

 

Former Prime Minister Victor Ponta criticises sometimes, but most of the times he does so constructively, Prime Minister Sorin Grindeanu said Monday.

Asked if he was about to consult with Ponta after the latter’s latest statements, Grindeanu said: “I do not know what you are talking about.”

“My concern is to carry through the government programme. I am speaking with a lot of people – so much the better if they are from the Social Democratic Party (PSD) [at rule] – from different quarters as well that help me and my colleagues implement this government programme. We certainly have meetings, we are talking to everybody – I do not think there is any problem with this government related to my discussions with Mr Dragnea or Mr Victor Ponta, whom I have noticed sometimes criticising. I would not say he criticises excessively. Just sometimes, but most of the time he does so constructively,” said Grindeanu.

He added he did not speak with Ponta over the past days.

 

 

 

 

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