POLITICS

President Iohannis: It’s Romania’s duty to really support Moldova; bombastic speech not helpful to either nation. “I prefer that, in the end, with all the very questionable course to somehow have some Justice Laws which we can move forward with”

It is Romania’s duty to really support the Republic of Moldova and the Moldovans, while “bombastic speech in an electoral key” do not help the citizens of either of the two countries, President Klaus Iohannis said on Wednesday after touring the Bucharest International Auto Show (SIAB).

He was asked by journalists about not attending on Tuesday a solemn ceremony in Parliament that marked 100 years since the unification of Bessarabia and Romania.

“The event itself, March 27, is of very great importance, which I have outlined in my message to the nation and is a very bright point in our history,” said Iohannis.

He mentioned a future-oriented approach of the Romania-Moldova relationship.

“I think it is important to know history, but also to see the present. If we are talking about the Republic of Moldova, I believe that it is Romania’s duty to really support the Republic of Moldova and the Moldovans,” he said.

Iohannis added that in all his conversations he also includes the topic of the Republic of Moldova.

“I am interested, I am concerned and I think that we can find this fact in many Romanians and even in some Romanian politicians. On the other hand, it is good for us to ask ourselves how we can really help Moldova today and I think we can do so through economic measures, through aid, for example through the financial aid we’ve had for Moldova,” Iohannis pointed out.

He also said that it is very important for Romania to support the neighbouring country on the European path.

“I think there is a point where political approaches are slightly different from politician to politician. I think that we need to help them, to be alongside them during their European journey and to do concrete things that reach the Moldovan citizens, and I think it is less important to have bombastic speeches in a populist, electoral key, because that does not help either nation,” Iohannis said.

 

‘I don’t see any reason to hurry and organize referendum on family’

 

Iohannis also stated that there is no reason, in his opinion, to hurry and organize a referendum on redefinition of family.

“May is a beautiful month, but I don’t know if it would be for a referendum too. (…) I don’t see any reason to hurry,” added Iohannis.

 

Iohannis says he prefers some justice laws which we can move forward with

 

Regarding the Justice laws, President Iohannis said that he prefers the drawing up of normative acts with which to go forward, mentioning that their course “has been very debated” and generated “the largest public scandal which Romania’s Parliament has ever created.”

“I am aware of all the constitutional leverages that I have,” the head of the state said.

He brought to mind that the laws have yet to arrive at the Presidential Administration.

“The moment they will get to me (…) I will make a public statement on this topic, on how I see the quality of these laws, what steps I envisage that need to be made, because, after all, I believe that it’s important to start from the premises that since we changed so much these laws and Parliament, with the steps on these Laws of Justice, created the biggest public scandal which Romania’s Parliament has ever created, at least now, in the end, let’s bring these laws to a form that is good for Romania,” the President said.

In his view, “it would be a shame, after so many talks, and so much scandal, to have some bad laws.”

“I prefer that, in the end, with all the very questionable course [of the justice laws] to somehow have some laws which we can move forward with,” Klaus Iohannis underscored.

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