ECONOMY FINANCE&BANKING

BNR: Romania’s forex reserves decline to 33.539 bln euro, in April

The forex reserves of the National Bank of Romania (BNR) decreased by 3.41 percent, to 33.538 billion euro in April, as compared to the end-March level, reads a press release of the institution issued  on Wednesday.

Inflows recorded in April amounted to 589 million euro, representing changes in the foreign exchange reserve requirements of the credit institutions, inflows into the Ministry of Public Finance’s accounts, into the European Commission’s accounts, a.s.o.

Outflows stood at 1.776 billion euro, representing changes in the minimum foreign exchange reserve requirements of the credit institutions, interest and principal payments on foreign currency public debt and others. Interest and principal payments on foreign currency public debt totalled around 1.416 billion euro, of which the repayment of principal and interest on the loan taken by the Ministry of Public Finances from the European Commission in 2009 was 1.238 billion euro.

According to BNR, the gold stock remained unchanged at 103.7 tonnes, priced at 3.626 billion euro, given the evolution of international prices.

Romania’ international reserves (foreign currencies and gold) at April 30, 2017 stood at 37.165 billion euro, compared with 38.309 billion euro at March 31, 2018.

Payments due this May on public and publicly guaranteed foreign currency denominated debt amount to roughly 157 million euro.

Related posts

National Bank issues collector coin set in celebration of centennial of Basarabia’s union with Romania

Nine O' Clock

President Iohannis, PM Tudose attend launch event of the Ford EcoSport model in Craiova: Partnership – key to economic success, irrespective of what politicians sometimes claim

Nine O' Clock

Vodafone Romania IoT smart solutions help retail companies succeed in their digital transformation journey . Vodafone IoT Barometer reports confidence and adoption increase in IoT technology . 74% of businesses that use IoT say that non-adopters will have fallen behind rivals within five years

NINE O'CLOCK