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Bucharest
May 24, 2022
JUSTICE

Bucharest Court of Appeal compels CSM to recognise Kovesi’s appropriate level of seniority with PICCJ

The Bucharest Court of Appeal compels the Prosecutor’s Section with the Superior Council of Magistrates (CSM) to recognise former National Anticorruption Directorate (DNA) head’s appropriate level of seniority with the Prosecutor’s Office attached to the High Court of Cassation and Justice (PICCJ).

In November 2018, Kovesi requested CSM to recognize her level of seniority corresponding to PICCJ, but her request was rejected, and the former chief prosecutor of DNA went on to sue CSM, winning the case.

However, the decision of the Bucharest Court of Appeal is not final.

Kovesi was revoked as Chief Prosecutor of the National Anticorruption Directorate by a decree issued on 9 July 2018 by President Klaus Iohannis, who enforced a Constitutional Court ruling. After the revocation, the CSM Prosecutor’s Section decided that Laura Codruta Kovesi should return to the Directorate for Investigating Organized Crime and Terrorism (DIICOT) Sibiu, where she worked before being appointed as Prosecutor General of Romania in 2006.

Later on, Prosecutor General Augustin Lazar decided that Laura Codruta Kovesi be delegated to the General Prosecutor’s Office – the Guidance and Control Service.

On October 15, Justice Minister Tudorel Toader declared that Laura Codruta Kovesi should leave the General Prosecutor’s Office if she does not have the appropriate level of seniority according to the new regulations introduced by the emergency ordinance amending the Justice laws.

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